Your Guide to Voting on Election Day in Georgia

Your Guide to Voting on Election Day in Georgia

Although Georgia allows voters to early vote at any location within their county, to vote on Election Day you must report to your assigned polling place. You can find that information on your My Voter PageClick here to see where to find the info once you’ve logged into the system.

You will also need to bring your ID with you. Any of the following will work:

  • A Georgia Driver’s License, even if expired
  • Any valid state or federal government issued photo ID, including a free ID Card issued by your county registrar’s office or the Georgia Department of Driver Services (DDS)
  • Valid employee photo ID from any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. Government, Georgia, or any county, municipality, board, authority or other entity of this state
  • Valid U.S. passport ID
  • Valid U.S. military photo ID
  • Valid tribal photo ID
  • A student ID with photo from a public (but not private!) college, university, or technical college.

You can bring printed information with you to help you vote, but you cannot use a cell phone or tablet or internet-enabled device while voting. You can view a sample ballot on your My Voter Page. Check out our candidate guide here for our guidance on referendums and amendments on your ballot.

FAQ

Check out the Democratic Party of Georgia’s FAQ here.

The poll worker tells me I’m at the wrong location. What should I do?

It depends. Do you believe you are at the wrong location? Where does MVP say your election day polling place is? Are you in the right county? (You need to be in the right county for your vote to count). Generally speaking, if it is later in the day it’s best to stay where you are and ask for a provisional ballot. If it’s early in the day and you have time, consider going to the correct location. Call the voter protection hotline for more assistance (888-730-5816).

The poll worker tells me I’m not registered. What should I do?

If you know you registered before the registration in the county in which you are trying to vote, ask the poll worker to look you up on the supplemental voter roles.  If the poll worker still cannot find, insist on voting a provisional ballot. Call the voter protection hotline for more assistance (888-730-5816).

Should I vote a provisional ballot?

On election day, if you are told you are not eligible to vote, try and work out the issue with the poll worker. However, if you can’t work it out, insist on voting a provisional ballot.  The poll worker must allow you to vote a provisional ballot if you ask to.  Report the incident to the voter protection hotline, 888-730-5816, as soon as possible. You will need to “cure” your ballot, and someone at the hotline will help you with that.

I’m elderly or have a physical disability. Are there any accommodations for me at the polls?

If you are 65 or older, or have a physical disability, you are entitled to go to the front of the line if there is one between the hours of 9:30 am and 4:30 pm.  Ask a poll worker.

Every polling location must have at least one location to vote while seated, such as in a wheelchair.  In addition, voters with disabilities should have the option of using a machine that provides different ways to cast ballots when you are visually impaired or blind that permit privacy, such as through an audio ballot where the voter can hear candidate names and questions through headphones.

You are also entitled to receive assistance from another person.  You can bring or ask anyone to help you except for the following categories of people: an employer, a labor union official, a candidate on the ballot, or the family member of a candidate on the ballot.

I have difficulty reading.  Can someone help me vote? 

Yes. You can bring or ask anyone to help you except for the following categories of people: an employer, a labor union official, a candidate on the ballot, or the family member of a candidate on the ballot. 

English is not my first language. Can someone help me when I vote?

Yes. A voter can bring an interpreter of his choice to assist in the polling booth. The only people who cannot serve as an interpreter are an employer, a labor union official, a candidate on the ballot, or the family member of a candidate on the ballot.

Can I still vote in person if I applied for an absentee ballot?

Yes, you can.  So long as you have not already voted your absentee ballot, you can choose to vote in person.  If you have your absentee ballot in your possession, take it with you to the polls and give it to the poll worker. The poll worker will dispose of your old ballot and let you vote at the polling place.  If you do not have your absentee ballot in your possession (for example, you have not received it yet, or you’ve misplaced it), that’s okay too. Simply tell the poll worker you applied for one, but that you’d like to vote in person instead. The poll worker will ask you to sign a form where you swear you haven’t voted, and then you’ll be permitted to vote in person.